FASD Elephant™ Podcast #018: “I Am Why… FASD Matters”

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“I Am Why… FASD Matters” – Awareness, Advocacy, and Prevention

Hi and welcome to the March FASD Elephant Podcast!
On March 24, 2014, MOFAS sponsored an FASD Matters Rally Day at the MN State Capitol to raise awareness of FASD, provide education and statistics about FASD to lawmakers, and kick off the MOFAS FASD Prevention Awareness Campaign. Another great day and great advocacy effort of all the folks who showed up because FASD MATTERS!

I interviewed eight rally attendees about Why FASD Matters to them and compiled their answers into today’s podcast. Unfortunately, the audio for two were lost–a professional and a parent who both had just had some great successes at IEP school meetings and helping school staff pay more attention to her daughter’s FASD and special needs.

However, we have great photos of them all and great stories from the other six: Emily Gunderson (MOFAS Communications Director), Lois Bickford (parent and long-time FASD advocate who was a starting Board Member of MOFAS), Barb Clark (MOFAS Family Resources Coordinator, parent, and fellow Blogger at Lord Grant Me Serenity), Alex Miller (FASD Youth Speaker) with his mom Laura and sister Torrie, Katie (Youth FASD Advocate) and her mom Ann, and Sue Terwey (MOFAS Family Engagement Director).

Enjoy the podcast above and the photo gallery below.

FASD Quotes from the Rally

FASD Matters and we’re not going to be invisible! ~Emily Gunderson

People with Fetal Alcohol get a chance to say what matters to them… when they can say what their brain feel like… and express what that means to them…, it makes a lot more sense to other people. ~Lois Bickford

We still have so much work to do to get the word out, because they’re still struggling for the right support. ~Barb Clark

My story can help others with FASD. ~Alex Miller

It’s important to understand FASD. It helps people out for things like getting jobs. ~Katie Moxa

People with this disorder need to be identified and valued for the challenges they have and all of the successes. ~Sue Terwey

[hr]Contact Michael Harris at michael [at] fasdelephant [dot] com for any questions or more information.[hr]

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